Friday, May 4, 2012

Collecting Cream

Recently, my girls and I and Murphala from Flour, Water, Yeast & Salt took a road trip to the Swiss Connection in Clay City, Indiana.    To buy milk.   And lots of it.  I got 4 gallons of fabulous raw milk.  

It was so worth every mile and every penny.  

This milk comes with a lot of cream.   You can see it more than 1/4 way down in the jugs.  

Mmmm.   I can feel my arteries hardening just thinking about it.

My problem with cream in jugs is that I always poured it all out into a really big bowl so I could skim the cream.    By hand....spoon, rather.   One little spoonful of cream at a time.

It was time consuming.  And the pouring sort of mixed in some of the cream, which defeats the purpose of taking the cream out.

So I was thinking I needed to buy one of those measuring cup thingies with the spout that goes to the bottom so you can put stock or whatever in it and pour off the stuff under the fat, which is floating on top.  

Do you know what I mean?    Eric had no idea what I was talking about.   At all.  

But I forgot to get one of those things.

And we had four gallons of milk whose cream I really wanted to separate out, but not one little spoonful at a time. 

Ya know?

But I was resigned.    And then Lily pulled out the turkey baster.

Because she's a genius.   

And we extracted the cream from the gallon jugs without having to pour it out into a big bowl and scooping the cream out one spoonful at a time.

And then I pasteurized the cream because I knew we'd want to keep it for a while for lots of things.

And we did.

And they were delicious. 

The End.

P.S.  Get a load of how much cream is in those jugs!  The cream is the yellower stuff at the top of the jugs.  Cool, huh!

8 comments:

  1. One of these days I'm posting about this trip. :-) It was a blast! I too used a turkey baster and put the cream in little jars and into the fridge. And lo, I look into the fridge a day later and the cream had risen to the top of all the milk I sucked out of the jug with the cream! I'm so uncoordinated... Any hints on how exactly to use the baster so that no milk sneaks in?

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    1. We ended up with a bit of milk, too. The only way I know to not get any is to leave the last layer of cream. Horrors.

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  2. After getting the cream into the smaller jars, would the turkey baster be long enough to reach the milk and siphon (most of) it off the bottom of the jar? Guess I'll go leave this comment at Murphala's blog too.

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    1. Kitten! That's a great idea! Our baster is long enough to do that in a quart jar.

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  3. Lily is totally a genius!

    I've been wanting to get raw milk for a while, but we haven't gotten around to it yet. Partly it's because we don't actually drink milk and I don't make yogurt or cheese or butter very often.

    To pasteurize the cream, do you just boil it to a certain temperature?

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    1. I heated it to the right temp [can't remember exactly what that is at this moment...] in a metal bowl set atop a pan of heating water. Slow, indirect heat to the right temp, then stuck it in the fridge. Worked perfectly.

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  4. Y'all are brilliant. Bruce's new job responsibility is Northeastern U.S. and Eastern Canada. And IT INCLUDES INDIANA. I'm totally going on a trip with him and descending on you and your kidlets and cream and Eric. And the bees. The end.

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    1. For reals?? AWESOME!! I can't wait!

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